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Alex, Maia, Meryl, and Charlie wait in the Athlete Lounge after skating at the US Nationals 2014.
Have a bonus Meryl reaction gif:

Alex, Maia, Meryl, and Charlie wait in the Athlete Lounge after skating at the US Nationals 2014.

Have a bonus Meryl reaction gif:

Madison Chock appreciation

The beauty of Andy though is that he goes to those really dark places so beautifully and of course embodies them so beautifully but he always retains  his manners. He’s always so pleasant. —x

Danai Gurira talking about Andrew Lincoln. (and laughing when he plays along)

Potter has done too much for me for me to ever want to shit all over it. I’m never going to say: ‘Don’t ask me questions about that’. I remember reading an interview with Robert Smith from The Cure. Somebody said to him: ‘Why do you still wear all that makeup, don’t you feel a bit past it?’ And he said: ‘There are still 14-year-olds coming to see The Cure for the first time, dressed like that. I’d never want to make them feel silly.’ It’s a similar thing with Potter. People are still discovering those books and films. It would be awful for them to find out the people involved had turned their backs on it. Though sometimes, people do come up and say ‘I loved you in The Woman in Black,’ which is really sweet. That’s them knowing that it matters to me that I’ve done other stuff.

- Daniel Radcliffe for London Magazine (x)

(Source: potterbird)

Brick Moments [2/?] - The Suicide King

vintagecrimeblacklizard:

On this day in 1909 Chester Himes was born in Jefferson City, Missouri.

“It seemed so illogical to punish some poor criminal for doing something that civilization taught him how to do so he could have something that civilization taught him how to want. It seemed to him as wrong as if they had hung the gun that shot the man.”
Chester Himes, Yesterday Will Make You Cry

Chester (Bomar) Himes began his writing career while serving in the Ohio State Penitentiary for armed robbery from 1929 - 1936. His account of the horrific 1930 Penitentiary fire that killed over three hundred men appeared in Esquire in 1932 and from this Himes was able to get other work published. From his first novel, If He Hollers Let Him Go (1945), Himes dealt with the social and psychological repercussions of being black in a white-dominated society. Beginning in 1953, Himes moved to Europe, where he lived as an expatriate in France and Spain. There, he met and was strongly influenced by Richard Wright. It was in France that he began his best-known series of crime novels—-including Cotton Comes to Harlem (1965) and Run Man Run (1966)—-featuring two Harlem policemen Gravedigger Jones and Coffin Ed Johnson. As with Himes’s earlier work, the series is characterized by violence and grisly, sardonic humor.